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Grammar or pronunciation or vocabulary?

What is the most important thing and what is the most difficult thing in learning a new language? My answer is always vocabulary.

You can express yourself with faulty grammar and less than perfect pronunciation. If you do not have the words you cannot express yourself. The constant battle to acquire enough vocabulary to read what you want to read, to say what you want to say and to understand what you want to understand, that is the hardest part.

 

The grammar comes as you need it with more and more exposure. Imperfect grammar and pronunciation do not prevent communication and enjoyment of the language. Lack of vocabulary does.

 

When I correct writing, it is overwhelmingly vocabulary, improper use of words and phrases that is the biggest problem, not grammar.

How do you accumulate words and phrases? You do so from input, from reading, and from listening to content that is of interest to you. You have to see the words and phrases often in different contexts. But then you have to use them in writing and speaking. Writing can really help because you can analyze what you are doing and which words you are using wrong.

It was the lack of a systematic method for accumulating words and phrases that motivated me to develop The Linguist.

Every language is worth learning

It seems that a good part of the language learning activity in the world is aimed at learning English. English is quite a young language. It is the combination on one small and cloudy North Atlantic Island of Anglo-Saxon, Norman French, Scandinavian even Latin and other influences. The collision of the different writing systems of these various languages and the famous “vowel shift” in England around the time that printing became widespread (15th century) all have contributed to the notoriously inconsistent spelling of English. Who would have thought that his language would become the most common international language? Who knows how long this will last?

Every language has its history, its culture and its charm. Every language has people who speak it, whom we can get to know. In the modern world where we can travel so easily and communicate cheaply by telephone or Internet we have an opportunity that no previous generation had. We can share a part of our lives with people all over the world in their languages. We can learn their languages more easily. Of course The Linguist helps make that even easier.

I learned nine languages and would gladly learn another nine. It gets easier with each language. There is no unlearnable language. Even a language as different from English as Chinese can be learned and give immense enjoyment.

Catalogs of Publications, Materials and Training Videos

Title:One-Stop Resource Guides
Link: http://www.ucp.org/ucp_generaldoc.cfm/1/3/43/43-43…
Description: Obtain the one-stop resource guide for your state or US Territory
Source: United Cerebral Palsy
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Title:Woodbine House Publishers
Link: http://www.woodbinehouse.com
Description: Publisher of a large selection of books, tapes, CD’s and DVD’s and videos for parents, children, teachers and professionals
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Title:Program Development Associates
Link: http://disabilitytraining.com/index.html
Description: Program Development Associates is a source for over 600 videos, CDs, DVDs and curricula on disability awareness, advocacy, developmental and learning disabilities, special education, physical disabilities, mental health, assistive technology, and vocational rehabilitation.
Source: EST
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Civil Rights
Title:Americans with Disabilities Act Home Page
Link: http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm
Description: This page is the U.S. Department of Justice Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Home Page.
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Title:Civil Rights: Ensuring Equal Opportunity and Protection under the Law
Link: http://www.disabilityinfo.gov/digov-public/public/…
Description: This section of DisabilityInfo.gov provides links to information on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other federal civil rights laws pertaining to people with disabilities, their families, employers, and community members.
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Title:Disability Rights Online News
Link: http://www.ada.gov/disabilitynews.htm
Description: This Web page contains monthly updates about the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division’s activities in the area of disability rights.
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Title:Guide to Disability Civil Rights Laws
Link: http://www.ncd.gov/disabilityrights.htm
Description: This guide, prepared by the National Council on Disability and the National Urban League, provides a summary of federal civil rights laws that ensure equal opportunity for people with disabilities. The original source for this information is the U.S. Department of Justice.
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Title:Guide to Disability Rights Laws
Link: http://www.ada.gov/cguide.htm
Description: This guide provides an overview of federal civil rights laws that ensure equal opportunity for people with disabilities.
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Title:Disability Law Lowdown Podcast
Link: http://english.disabilitylawlowdown.com/
Description: Brought to you by nationally recognized leaders in the field of disability law, the Disability Law Lowdown Podcast delivers the latest in disability rights information every other week. You can subscribe for free and have shows automatically delivered, or you can listen to the show and read the transcripts from this site. Podcasts are available in English, Spanish, ASL. Transcripts are also available in English and Spanish. Recent topics include: Social Security, Transportation, ADA FAQs, and the Fair Housing Act.
Source: EST
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Title:My Country
Link: http://www.ada.gov/videogallery.htm#my_country
Description: In this one-hour documentary, symphony conductor James DePreist, who contracted polio as a young man, profiles three people with disabilities whose lives have been shaped by the struggle for equal rights. Mr. DePreist is the nephew of African American contralto Marian Anderson, who in 1939 was prevented from singing at Constitution Hall. He draws parallels between racial barriers and the barriers faced by people with disabilities.
Videos are available in RealPlayer or Quick Time format; also with Video and Audio only, Video with Captions and Audio, Video and Audio with Audio Description, or Video and Audio with Audio Description and Captions.
Source: EST
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Title:Disability Rights Virtual Exhibit
Link: http://americanhistory.si.edu/disabilityrights/wel…
Description: The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History hosts an online museum of disability rights information and exhibit items.
Source: EST
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Title:JAN’s Accommodation and Compliance Series: The ADA Amendments Act of 2008
Link: (http://www.jan.wvu.edu/bulletins/adaaa1.htm)
Description: The new ADA Amendments Act of 2008 became effective on January 1, 2009. While the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has not yet completed the regulations for the new legislation, the Job Accomodation Network (JAN) has developed a publication and resource page regarding what information is currently available about the Act.
The new publication is called JAN’s Accommodation and Compliance Series: The ADA Amendments Act of 2008. This document will be periodically updated as additional information is made public. A full listing of JAN’s ADA Amendments Act of 2008 resources can be found at: http://www.jan.wvu.edu/LINKS/adalinks.htm
Source: EST
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Title:Disability History: An Important Part of America’s Heritage
Link: http://www.dol.gov/odep/documents/Disability%20His…
Description: Teaching children about the contributions of particular populations to our nation’s history, such as women and people of various ethnic backgrounds, has been recognized as important through the declaration of dedicated months as well as other educational programs. Disability history, however, has been largely ignored in school curricula. This is particularly paradoxical since anyone, regardless of age, race, or heritage, may become a part of the population of people with disabilities at any time. But the tide is beginning to turn—due mainly to the grassroots efforts of young disability leaders.
This document gives an overview of several youth-led state efforts and the positive outcomes that result from the involvement in such efforts. The document also includes an extensive list of resources.
Source: NCLD/Youth
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Title:New Disability Law Handbook
Link: http://www.swdbtac.org/html/publications/dlh/disab…
Description: The Disability Law Handbook, from Disability.gov, provides information on rights and obligations under federal disability laws, including an overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The entire publication can be downloaded in PDF format by clicking the above link.
Source: EST
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Everyone is a linguist. Everyone has their price.

When I was 17 I could only speak one language. Now I speak 9. I am convinced that most people can learn to speak many languages. We are all potential linguists.

I am astounded at how strongly people cling to the belief that they cannot learn. This belief then becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy.

I like to ask “if I gave you a million dollars to learn the language in 6 months, or if your life depended on it, do you think you could learn?” Then the answer is yes. I guess like in the story about the old man and the pretty young socialite at the cocktail party, everyone has their price.

Conversation class

We had a conversation class tonight with about 20 English learners, in Blenz cafe on the corner of Richards and Hastings in Vancouver. It has been raining hard the last few days and I am concerned about the snow conditions in the nearby mountains, especially Whistler.

People like to get together and talk in a foreign language. Really I should run a bistro where people can just meet and talk in English or other languages they are learning. I also like meeting people and talking, in whatever language. Yet just getting together to talk, as important as it is, is not enough. People still need to work at their language. You cannot get away from listening and reading and deliberately adding to your vocabulary of words and phrases.

I had been listening to  a Chinese CD of The Romance of the Three Kingdoms, the famous Chinese epic novel. Now I am listening to  a history of Sweden in Swedish. I also have the book which is word for word the same as the CDs. It is very interesting to learn about the history of Sweden and I have the impression that I am learning better than if I just read the book. After listening to a chapter I read the book. This is really a very effective way to learn anything, even in your own language. It is even more effective for learning a foreign language.

I think that the combination of CDs and books could replace much of what is taught in lectures at universities. With an Internet chatroom, voice and text, with other learners and the professor, who needs to attend classes. The rest of the learning should take place in a cafe or bar or discussion place.

Phrases, the key to natural learning

Native speakers of any language know naturally which words belong together. They have heard their own language so often and in so many situations that they can naturally put words together in a way that sounds effective. The foreign learner cannot do this.

Unfortunately most language schools teach vocabulary and grammar. Vocabulary is very important. You need words, not only the high frequency words, but also the less frequent words, in order to be able to deal with many situations. But research has shown that you cannot learn them from lists or in groups. You cannot learn by studying the terms for the parts of the body, or what to say at the train station, or the colours, or opposites or words that mean the same thing. This will only confuse you. You need to learn words in context.

The ideal context is the phrase. You can learn a phrase to go with each new word you learn. Soon you will have a variety of phrases with the new words you have learned. Each phrases gives the word a slightly different meaning. Each phrase is a proven way of using the new word in combination with other words.

Every sentence is unique, but phrases repeat themselves often. A phrase is any group of two or more, (usually no more than five) words that naturally belong together and can be used in many situations.

Learn to look for phrases, save them and learn them. One word of caution is necessary, however. The phrases must come from meaningful content that you are listening to and reading. Free examples of sentences and phrases from dictionaries are false friends. You think you are learning but you are not. You need to find your own phrases as you discover the language from interesting content. That is why at The Linguist we let you create your own database of phrases from the real life content that you find in our large library, or from other articles that you find on the Internet.

The false friends of language learning

There must be millions if not hundreds of millions of people who study languages. Most of them are frustrated and do not achieve fluency. I believe it is the false friends of language learning that let them down.

These false friends are:

the classroom

text books

grammar explanations

exercises and drills

vocabulary lists and books

conversation class

thick dictionaries

Why are these false friends? Because they are not natural. They do not offer real communication in the language. I am sure that most people who are fluent in a second or third language did not learn from these false friends. They learned by listening, reading and communicating in the language on subjects of interests, in other words, for real. Maybe they learned from friends, from TV, or from movies or from necessity, but the key is that they were motivated to learn. They took over the learning process and did not rely on the false friends. Certainly I was only able to achieve fluency in nine languages by studying on my own.

Anybody out there with some language learning experience to share?

Some myths of language learning

Along with the false friends of language learning, there are myths. These also hold people back. Here I will mention just a few.

“You have to have a talent for languages in order to learn.”

Is it likely that this talent for languages exists only with certain nations? Is it likely that the Dutch and Swedes are all born with this talent for languages whereas the English are not? Is it likely that Singaporeans are all talented while the Chinese are not? I do not think so. Instead it is a matter of attitude and exposure to the language.

“I have to go to the country to learn the language.”

This is not so. I grew up in Montreal surrounded by French, but I was not interested in learning French until I reached the age of 17. When I became motivated, I learned. There are many immigrants in Canada who never learn to speak well. Yet I have met people in places like China who were absolutely fluent in English. I learned to become fluent in Mandarin in a city where the language was not spoken, Hong Kong.

Exposure alone will not do it. If you are motivated and know how to create your own interesting language world to learn from, you can learn anywhere. This is the key to effective language learning. I know. I have done it many times.

“You have to have an ear for music to learn languages.”

I lived in Japan for nine years. I often went to karaoke. Most Japanese men at karaoke bars are good singers, and have a good ear for music. Very few of them are good at languages. They either are not motivated or do not have an effective system for learning.

” My teacher is no good.”

It is not the school or teacher that will determine language learning success. It is the learner. The greatest role of the teacher is to stimulate the learner, to help the learner become a truly motivated independent learner. It is still up to the learner to learn.

” Only children can learn languages well.”

Children are uninhibited, encouraged and not corrected, spend a lot of time using a new language with their peers, and do not hide in their own language and culture while resisting a new language as adults do. On the other hand adults know more, have a wider vocabulary and can learn faster. If they can imitate the attitude of the child and take advantage of their own greater knowledge and experience, they will learn faster than any child. They may not be able to achieve accent free pronunciation but that is the only area where they are at a disadvantage. Even there, it is a matter of attitude.

Education

Title:Check & Connect
Link: http://ici.umn.edu/checkandconnect/default.html
Description: The Check & Connect model uses mentors to promote students’ engagement with school, reduce dropout, and increase school completion. The Check & Connect Web site offers information regarding the Check & Connect model, current projects and initiatives, related publications, upcoming presentations and workshops, and staff.
The Check & Connect Web site contains information directed towards educators, researchers, administrators, and others interested in helping youth remain engaged in school and on track to graduate.
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Title:Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
Link: http://idea.ed.gov/explore/home
Description: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs’ (OSEP’s) IDEA Web site provides information related to The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Individualized Education Programs (IEP’s).
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Title:National Center on Educational Outcomes
Link: http://cehd.umn.edu/nceo
Description: The National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) provides national leadership in the participation of students with disabilities in national and state assessments, standards-setting efforts, and graduation requirements. The NCEO Web site provides links to publications related to educational outcomes and contains a link to the NCEO Data Viewer, which lets you view information related to students with disabilities and create individualized reports based on criteria that you can choose.
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Title:NCLB and IDEA: What Parents of Students with Disabilities Need to Know and Do
Link: http://cehd.umn.edu/nceo/OnlinePubs/Parents.pdf
Description: The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) are two of the nation’s most important federal laws relating to the education of children. While NCLB seeks to improve the education of all children – with an emphasis on children from low-income families – IDEA focuses on the individual child and seeks to ensure specialized services for children with disabilities so that they may benefit from education. This document describes the NCLB and IDEA and gives an overview of information that students with disabilities and their parents should know about the NCLB and IDEA.
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Title:Student’s Guide to the IEP
Link: http://www.nichcy.org/pubs/stuguide/st1.pdf
Description: This document provides information a student needs to know to be part of their Individual Education Program team.
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Title:Preparing for College
Link: http://www.ncld.org/content/view/894/
Description: This article, written by Liz Getzel and available on the National Center for Learning Disabilities Web site, discusses what high school students with disabilities need to know about preparing for college, including specific activities for academic preparation, tips on exploring college environments, and questions to ask regarding campus services and supports.
Source: EST
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Title:ThinkCollege.net
Link: http://www.thinkcollege.net
Description: The ThinkCollege.net Web site provides information and links to anyone interested in finding out more about the possibilities for youth with intellectual disabilities considering college. The Web site is divided into sections for students, family members, and professionals and features a searchable database of postsecondary education programs that support youth with intellectual disabilities, a discussion board designed by students – for students who are interested in sharing college experiences, the “Choice for Everyone” Listserv hosted by the Institute for Community Inclusion, and a resource section.
Source: EST
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Title:Going to College
Link: http://www.going-to-college.org/
Description: This new Web site contains information about living college life with a disability. It is designed for high school students. The site provides video clips, activities, and resources that can help them get a head start in planning for college. Video interviews with college students with disabilities offer a way to hear firsthand from students with disabilities who have been successful. Modules include activities that will help students explore more about themselves, learn what to expect from college, and equip them with important considerations and tasks to complete when planning for college.
Source: ADD
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Title:NYLN Teleconference on Education
Link: http://www.ilru.org/html/training/webcasts/archive…
Description: A National Teleconference and Webcast presented by the National Youth Leadership Network (NYLN) was given on April 14, 2009. Please click on the above link to access the archived Webcast and transcript.
AGENDA:
• Independent Living: Links to life after high school, post-secondary and beyond!
• Transition: Links between school and career goals!
• Education for all: Individuals with cognitive disabilities succeeding in post-secondary education!
• Guest speaker: Micah Fialka-Feldman, Disability Rights Advocate
• Guest Speaker: Jeff Moyer, Public speaker and Human Rights Advocate
Source: NYLN
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Title:Graduation Requirements and Diploma Options
Link: http://www.ncwd-youth.info/resources_&_Publication…
Description: This InfoBrief, Graduation Requirements and Diploma Options for Students with Disabilities: What Families and Advocates Need to Know, was developed by the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Y). It explores the importance of making informed decisions about diploma options, understanding the consequences of graduating with different types of diplomas as well as the need for youth, families, and Individual Education Program (IEP) teams to consider these issues early.
Source: NCLD/Youth
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Title:Student Loan Income-Based Repayment Program
Link: http://projectonstudentdebt.org/files/pub/July_1_2…
Description: On July 1, a major new student loan repayment option, Income-Based Repayment, will become available for the first time, providing much-needed financial relief for hundreds of thousands of federal student loan borrowers. There is also good news for students still in college, including more money for Pell Grants and lower interest rates for some student loans.
Income-Based Repayment (IBR) caps monthly loan payments based on income and family size, and forgives any debt and interest remaining after 25 years of payments.
Click on the above link for more information about IBR – including a calculator to estimate eligibility and payments, and a short animated video (“Ditch Your Debt Gremlin”) explaining the program.
Source: EST
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Employment

Title:AmeriCorps
Link: http://www.americorps.org/Default.asp
Description: Each year, AmeriCorps offers 75,000 opportunities for adults of all ages and backgrounds to serve through a network of partnerships with local and national nonprofit groups.
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Title:ETA DisAbility Online
Link: http://www.doleta.gov/disability
Description: The Employment & Training Administration (ETA) Disabilities Program develops and implements workforce disability policy and program initiatives to address structural, programmatic, and systemic employment barriers for people with disabilities. The ETA Disabilities Program Web site provides links to employment and training resources and other employment-related information.
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Title:Hire Abilities Hawaii
Link: http://www.hireabilitieshawaii.org/Home.aspx
Description: The Hire Abilities Hawaii Web site provides information and resources on employment, self-employment, and work incentives for people with disabilities.
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Title:National Business & Disability Council
Link: http://www.business-disability.com/index.aspx
Description: The National Business & Disability Council is a resource for employers seeking to integrate people with disabilities into the workplace and companies seeking to reach them in the consumer marketplace.
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Title:National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth
Link: http://www.ncwd-youth.info
Description: The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) assists state and local workforce development systems to better serve youth with disabilities. The NCWD/Youth is composed of partners with expertise in disability, education, employment, and workforce development issues. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), the NCWD/Youth is housed at the Institute for Educational Leadership.
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Title:The National Service Inclusion Project
Link: http://www.serviceandinclusion.org
Description: The National Service Inclusion Project (NSIP) promotes the active engagement of people with disabilities as service members in all levels of national and community service.
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Title:National Youth Employment Coalition
Link: http://www.nyec.org
Description: The National Youth Employment Coalition (NYEC) is a non-partisan national organization dedicated to promoting policies and initiatives that help youth succeed in becoming lifelong learners, productive workers, and self-sufficient citizens. This site contains information on legislation, best practices, and leadership development, as well as a variety of projects and initiatives.
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Title:Worksupport.com
Link: http://www.worksupport.com
Description: The Worksupport.com Web site provides information, resources, and research about work and disability issues. The Worksupport.com Web site includes a listing of research, projects, an online store, training information, and a free e-newsletter.
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Title:Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS)
Link: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/disabilityresearch/w…
Description: Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) is a Social Security Income (SSI) provision to help individuals with disabilities return to work. PASS lets individuals with disabilities set aside money and/or things he or she owns to pay for items or services needed to achieve a specific work goal. Items and services can include supplies to start a business, school expenses, equipment and tools, transportation and uniform requests. PASS lets people set aside money for installment payments as well as a down payment for things like a vehicle, wheelchair, or computer if these items are needed to reach their work goal.
Source: EST
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Title:Small Business Training Network
Link: http://www.sba.gov/services/training/onlinecourses…
Description: The Small Business Training Network (SBTN) is a customer-focused U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) strategy designed to enrich, educate and empower small businesses. It is an Internet-based learning environment – operating like a virtual campus – offering free online courses, workshops, publications, information resources, learning tools and direct access to electronic counseling, and other forms of technical assistance. Course topics include:
– Starting a Business
– Business Planning
– Business Marketing
– Financing and Accounting
– Government Contracting
– Risk Management & Cyber Security
– Federal Tax Training
– Small Business Retirement
Source: EST
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Title:Ticket to Work Program
Link: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/work/aboutticket.htm…
Description: The Ticket to Work Program is the key to unlocking vocational rehabilitation, training, job referrals, and other ongoing support and services to help you reach your employment goals. The program is available for people who are between the ages of 18 and 65 and receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for people who are disabled or blind.
You can take your Ticket to any Employment Network (EN), State Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) agency, or Work Incentives Planning and Assistance Center (WIPA) to request assistance in job training, preparing materials to use to find a job, locating employers informing you about work incentives and other assistance in you may need to work. Go to https://secure.ssa.gov/apps10/oesp/providers.nsf/bystate to view a list of WIPA providers by state.
Source: EST
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Title:Career Voyages
Link: http://www.careervoyages.gov
Description: The Career Voyages Web site is the result of a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Education. It is designed to provide information on high growth, in-demand occupations along with the skills and education needed to attain those jobs. Information is available in English and Spanish.
Source: EST
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Title:Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities (WRP)
Link: https://wrp.gov/
Description: The Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP) is a recruitment and referral program that connects Federal sector employers nationwide with highly motivated postsecondary students and recent graduates with disabilities who are eager to prove their abilities in the workplace through summer or permanent jobs. Co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) and the U.S. Department of Defense with the participation of many other Federal agencies, the WRP has provided employment opportunities for over 4,000 students since 1995.
Source: EST
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Title:Start-Up USA Self-Employment Fact Sheet
Link: http://www.start-up-usa.biz/resources/content.cfm?…
Description: Medicaid Waivers may be one of the tools that individuals with disabilities can use to support self-employment. While not every individual with a disability will be able to use a Waiver for self-employment, those individuals who are already receiving services, or who are eligible to become Waiver participants can explore the possibility in their states. This Q and A provides an overview and examples of how individuals with disabilities have used Medicaid Waivers to support self-employment. Information provided by Monday Morning in Washington, D.C. (The Arc of the United States, 2007).
Source: EST
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Title:Spanish Language Job Accomodation Resources
Link: http://www.jan.wvu.edu/espanol/
Description: The Job Accomodation Network (JAN) is strongly committed to serving the Hispanic American workforce. JAN’s outreach efforts include consultation and technical assistance in Spanish. This Web site highlights JAN’s Spanish resources and is intended for JAN’s English-speaking audience who would like to help distribute JAN literature to the Hispanic community.
Source: EST
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Title:Job Accomodation Network
Link: http://www.jan.wvu.edu/
Description: Job Accomodation Network (JAN) is a free consulting service of the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor. JAN was designed to increase the employability of people with disabilities by: 1) providing individualized worksite accommodations solutions, 2) providing technical assistance regarding the ADA and other disability related legislation, and 3) educating callers about self-employment options.
Source: EST
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Title:LimeConnect
Link: http://www.limeconnect.com/
Description: LimeConnect matches the employment needs of corporations with the skill sets of persons with disabilities. LimeConnect, founded in 2006, connects college students and professional candidates with disabilities through “private recruiting efforts” with Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs, PepsiCo, and Google, its four major partners.
Source: EST
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Title:National Business & Disability Council
Link: http://www.business-disability.com/index.aspx
Description: For more than 30 years, the National Business & Disability Council (NBDC) has been providing people with disabilities the resources needed to get jobs. NBDC boasts more than 30 corporate members, including AIG, Liz Claiborne, and Proctor & Gamble. The group leads the diversity-internship program “Emerging Leaders” and also hosts “an invitation-only Wall Street job fair for candidates seeking jobs at financial-service firms,” such as Lehman Brothers and Goldman Sachs.
Source: EST
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Title:Ticket to Work Conference Schedule
Link: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/work/events.html
Description: This Web site hosts a calendar of events (conference, meetings, etc.) at which you can learn more about the Ticket to Work Program.
The Ticket to Work Program provides most people receiving Social Security benefits (beneficiaries) more choices for receiving employment services. Under this program, the Social Security Administration (SSA) issues tickets to eligible beneficiaries who, in turn, may choose to assign those tickets to an Employment Network (EN) of their choice to obtain employment services, vocational rehabilitation services, or other support services necessary to achieve a vocational (work) goal. The EN, if they accept the ticket, will coordinate and provide appropriate services to help the beneficiary find and maintain employment.
This is also an opportunity to meet others with disabilities and those engaged in disability and work related activities.
Source: EST
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Title:EARNWorks & the Workforce Recruitment Program
Link: https://wrp.gov/LoginPre.do?method=login
Description: EARNWorks is the Web site of the Employer Assistance & Recruiting Network (EARN). EARN is a free service that connects employers with qualified jobseekers with disabilities. EARN also provides employers with consultative services on disability matters. EARN is also the “entryway” for private sector employers to access the Workforce Recruitment Program (WRP).
The WRP is an excellent resource if you are looking to recruit talented college students with disabilities for summer or permanent positions. The WRP maintains a database of hundreds of motivated postsecondary students and recent graduates eager to prove their abilities in the workforce. Representing all majors and hailing from over 200 colleges and universities nationwide, these applicants have been pre-screened through face-to-face interviews, ensuring they are more than qualified to meet your workforce needs.
EARNWorks and the WRP are provided by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP).
Source: EST
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Title:Diversifying Your Workforce, A Four-Step Reference Guide to Recruiting, Hiring & Retaining Employees with Disabilities
Link: http://www.dol.gov/odep/documents/Flip%20Guide_FIN…
Description: To meet the need for a comprehensive, portable, and easy to understand guide for employers who are looking to recruit, hire, and retain employees with disabilities, ODEP just released its new Four-Step Reference Guide. The online version of this valuable resource, which covers topics such as Incentives & ROI, Recruiting, Interviewing & Hiring, and much more, also provides a wealth of links and other resources.
The print version of Diversifying Your Workforce, A Four-Step Reference Guide to Recruiting, Hiring & Retaining Employees with Disabilities will be available later this year. In the meantime, the PDF version is available online.
Source: EST
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Title:Business Case for Hiring People with Disabilities
Link: http://www.earnworks.com/BusinessCase/index.asp
Description: The recently revised Business Case for Hiring People with Disabilities, including veterans with disabilities, features video clips, research and other information from businesses and industry leaders on how hiring people with disabilities improves an organization’s bottom line across six themes: Return on Investment, Human Capital, Innovation, Marketing, Diversity and Social Responsibility.
Source: EST
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Title:Disability Program Navigator (DPN) Initiative
Link: http://www.doleta.gov/disability/new_dpn_grants.cf…
Description: The U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration and the Social Security Admnistration (SSA) are jointly funding the DPN Initiative in 44 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the United States Virgin Islands where SSA implemented employment support initiatives. This Initiative promotes comprehensive services and work incentive information for SSA beneficiaries and other people with disabilities, through the One Stop system. The Initiative focuses on developing new and ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated access to services, creating systemic change, and expanding the workforce development system’s capacity to serve customers with disabilities and employers.
Source: EST
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Title:Social Security Administration (SSA) Is Hiring
Link: http://www.ssa.gov/work/scheduleA/
Description: The Social Security Administration (SSA) recently received funding to hire more employees throughout the country. This hiring initiative offers a unique opportunity for individuals with disabilities who may want to work for SSA. These jobs will be at various skill levels including a number of entry-level positions.
Click on the above link for more information. To search and apply for jobs visit USAJOBS (http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/a9ssajob.asp).
Source: EST
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